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Tight End Blocking


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How many tines have you seen this: A tight end who has an assignment- whether used as a lead blocker on an outside run, as a trap blocker, or as a blocker from the line of scrimmage assigned with going across the field and blocking a linebacker- not making the block?

 

The contrast between our weak and ineffective tight end blocking and MSU's tough and effective pulling guard/tight end and H back blocking was extraordinary. They always got their body firmly in front of our players with a push, while we more often than not (weakly) give a half a$$ed effort like the one below.

 

This is another reason I'd go to 4 receivers and take the tight ends off the field. A faster slot receiver would have gotten to the linebacker much faster and be able to more quickly react in the moment. This linebacker, who was flowing in the direction of the sweep towards the tight end, should have had his head blown off. Instead, he gets a weak push from the side and makes the tackle.

 

Pitiful.

 

 

RileyBullough.gif

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I dunno. The bigger problem I see and would have made the play much better is getting rid of this blocking scheme. There is no drive from the OL at all. The first steps of our OL is either stepping backwards like a pass set on the back side or standing up out of our stance. There's no forward push. On the right it would have been a lot more effective if the RG doubled down with the center which would've allowed the TE to crack down on the MLB. How is the hole going to open on the left when the OL are giving ground on their first step and their DL are being ultra aggressive in their push?

 

Regardless, I am not a fan of our run blocking at all. We have one of the biggest OL in the nation and should be able to drive the defense backwards. Our blocking has always been too finese in Kelly's offense. We've seen small DL like Navy drive our OL backwards or stalemate them at the LOS. That's pathetic! Yeah I'm old school, and have seen people critical of myself and others for our opinion about power running games, and how the game has passed us by. Bullspit, OSU, Stanford, MSU, and Bama have great power run games with dominant OL blocking and those team are usually pretty good. An added bonus to having power run blocking, is how it also makes your DL and LBs tougher seeing it in practice every day. Iron sharpens iron.

 

I could go on all day about this.

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that TE block was pretty weak.

 

But the MSU blocking was great in general. We had no answer for 2 OL pulling and they did it over and over. Amazing that we don't do that. It's all scheme...

 

Exactly... but hey Kelly is an offensive mastermind his ways always work better.

 

What a joke the tight end position has become here.

Edited by ndomer4
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I think this is actually a mistake by Kizer.

 

I believe this play is actually two plays in one, with the option to run either. The first is the sprint draw, the play run in the clip. The other is speed option, where Kizer would simply run as fast as he can to the right and Adams would trail 3 yards behind in something of a conventional option play. Kizer decides at the line which play to run based on defensive alignment.

 

In the clip, you can see that ND has MSU out-flanked to the right, which should tell him to run the speed option that way. I'm guessing Kizer read the safety on the upper hash instead (which may or may not be the read he's taught), figured they couldn't block him, and so he called the sprint draw. That's an incredibly difficult block for Weishar, who isn't a great blocker to begin with. That said, even if Weishar does scoop the middle linebacker, the weak side linebacker (#23) is completely unblocked as well. Not a good play at all against this alignment.

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I dunno. The bigger problem I see and would have made the play much better is getting rid of this blocking scheme. There is no drive from the OL at all. The first steps of our OL is either stepping backwards like a pass set on the back side or standing up out of our stance. There's no forward push. On the right it would have been a lot more effective if the RG doubled down with the center which would've allowed the TE to crack down on the MLB. How is the hole going to open on the left when the OL are giving ground on their first step and their DL are being ultra aggressive in their push?

 

Regardless, I am not a fan of our run blocking at all. We have one of the biggest OL in the nation and should be able to drive the defense backwards. Our blocking has always been too finese in Kelly's offense. We've seen small DL like Navy drive our OL backwards or stalemate them at the LOS. That's pathetic! Yeah I'm old school, and have seen people critical of myself and others for our opinion about power running games, and how the game has passed us by. Bullspit, OSU, Stanford, MSU, and Bama have great power run games with dominant OL blocking and those team are usually pretty good. An added bonus to having power run blocking, is how it also makes your DL and LBs tougher seeing it in practice every day. Iron sharpens iron.

 

I could go on all day about this.

 

This is so true. I flipped on the OSU-OKLA game after and the OSU line is moving forward everytime. It kind of blew my mind that Weber and Barrett constantly had positive yards before they even hit contact.

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This is so true. I flipped on the OSU-OKLA game after and the OSU line is moving forward everytime. It kind of blew my mind that Weber and Barrett constantly had positive yards before they even hit contact.

 

That's because Meyer always stayed he wants to be on cue. Always positive yards. Can't do that if the o-line is pass blocking when it's a run. At least that's what it looked like to my untrained eye.

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Its nice to see that play in loop. Yes, the TE's assignment made the play (and a really good one) but that play was going no where. OL (I think) messed up as well. So, from my understanding, misdirection plays are effective if you see that the defense is over anticipating or pursuing. The misdirection is supposed to help your offense be in a great position to block. I think the play call was fine because MSU was flowing hard on the bootleg/option play. So the center and RG double #4 and the double is engaged way too long. From my playing days (and there weren't many so I am no expert), the RG should engage for a second so that #4 doesn't come crashing in to break the whole play up and the C should be pushing #4 completely out of the play and then the RG should get to the second level ASAP to get a LB. If my read on the play is right, that miscue means that the play had little chance of popping for a big gain.

 

Hard to tell who was the weakest link without knowing the exact play call.

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Its nice to see that play in loop. Yes, the TE's assignment made the play (and a really good one) but that play was going no where. OL (I think) messed up as well. So, from my understanding, misdirection plays are effective if you see that the defense is over anticipating or pursuing. The misdirection is supposed to help your offense be in a great position to block. I think the play call was fine because MSU was flowing hard on the bootleg/option play. So the center and RG double #4 and the double is engaged way too long. From my playing days (and there weren't many so I am no expert), the RG should engage for a second so that #4 doesn't come crashing in to break the whole play up and the C should be pushing #4 completely out of the play and then the RG should get to the second level ASAP to get a LB. If my read on the play is right, that miscue means that the play had little chance of popping for a big gain.

 

Hard to tell who was the weakest link without knowing the exact play call.

 

The lane the RB is supposed to run through is the gap created between the left guard Quentin Nelson #56 and the left tackle McGlinchey, but the TE was too slow and ineffective to move the LB out of the lane they created. Secondarily, if he blocks the ILB horizontally, he blocks the WLB's way to a direct shot at Adams. If he's blocked horizontally towards McGlinchey, then it's Adam's job to elude the the slot linebacker and head up field. Worst case this should have been a 5 yard gain, but the inept TE block turned it into a 1 yard loss.

Edited by Frankus
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We are no longer Tight End U. And will not have a chance to be again until Brian Kelly is gone with this crappy zone read offensive scheme. Is there another over confident, press pleasant, Catholic head coach out there that has a pro style offensive scheme we can take a flyer on?

Edited by VCDomer
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We are no longer Tight End U. And will not have a chance to be again until Brian Kelly is gone with this crappy zone read offensive scheme. Is there another over confident, press pleasant, Catholic head coach out there that has a pro style offensive scheme we can take a flyer on?

 

Some dude who coaches in Ohio. I think frank zolich? I can't remember. Ties to Lou Holtz though.

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